How Educational Apps Are Helping Children With Autism

At Emma Cooper’s home in downtown Denver, emotional and social learning is a much discussed issue. Emma’s six-year old son Alec, who was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder when he was two, can’t always pick up social cues naturally. Emma was always on the lookout for creative ways to help her son enhance his social skills. Since Alec loved to fiddle with his mother’s iPad, Emma was pleased to download the “Math on the Farm” and Make Sentences” autism educational apps for her son.

But before she could allow Alec use the two apps, Emma herself sat down to check the content of the two autism apps for his son. She found that the content was just perfect for him. Both the apps were fun to play with. The navigation buttons were a little tricky to use at the beginning. But as soon Alec got accustomed to them, the rest was pretty much easy. It has been a smooth sailing ever since.

Emma loved the two autism education apps because they kept Alec engaged and also encouraged discussion. For instance, users can input their names and record sounds. This could be a happy or a sad sound. You may really get silly if you want, like Alec, who loves to record robot-like sounds.

The design of “Math on the Farm” and Make Sentences” autism educational apps is clean. None of the apps are over-stimulating. The sound effects and music is far from annoying. You can turn them off easily. The stories in the autism apps, like in real life, give multiple choices to the user to resolve social situations, and don’t give just a single solution, irrespective of the circumstances.

The “Math on the Farm” and Make Sentences” autism educational apps have been designed in a way to help autistic children in elementary school to understand social expectations.

The developers behind these two apps had interacted with the parents of children having autism to understand what the kids really want. They also spoke to parents of children diagnosed with high-functioning autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In fact, the apps reinforce the old adage: “necessity is the mother of invention.”

The most important part of these two apps is that they encourage critical thinking and imparts valuable skills. In fact, the “Math on the Farm” and Make Sentences” autism educational apps have almost become a trendsetter, with many companies coming up with similar products.


Source by Kevin Carter

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Mum/The Boss/Editor at Autism Club
Georgie B aka Autism Club Mum is designer,listener and most importantly mummy to 2 beautiful cheeky teen boys with Autism. I want to help make life a little more easier for all of us, whether it be in sharing information, passing on what I have learned including mistakes made, laughing about everything else or just free goodies - we all love them right? God knows its not going to be an easy road ahead so don't do it alone, join us!