Christian Students Belong In Public Schools

The public schools need Christian students. But only those students who are properly trained. Christian students should be in the public schools standing up for what they know to be true, backing up their arguments with evidence and witnessing to both their fellow students and faculty alike. But in order to make that happen they will need training. Only those soldiers who are trained for battle should go off to war.

The church makes a great effort to send missionaries throughout the world in order to spread God’s word. But at the same time we are ignoring one of the largest mission fields in existence today. At a public school, for the first 13 to 14 years of a young persons life they are immersed in a naturalistic environment. Those students in the public schools who do not know Jesus Christ need missionaries just as much as any African native. I believe that the children of Christian parents should receive proper training and attend a public school.

I did not always feel this way. My wife and I home-schooled our own children. And I was once a teacher at a private Christian school. At one time I thought that it was best to educate a child in an environment where Christ is Lord – either at home or in a Christian school. But I now realize that there is a vast difference between education and training. I now believe that these conservative methods of education actually violate God’s word. The Bible states that we are to be a light on a hill. By withdrawing unto ourselves for our children’s education, whether at home or in private schools, we are in fact putting a basket over that light.

What the Church needs to do, both its leaders and its members, is to train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it. We should always be ready to give an answer to everyone who asks for a reason concerning the hope that is in us. But this is precisely where we let our children down. When it comes to science I am afraid that most of us have no answer.

We live in an age of reason. Like it or not things are different now than they were in the past. Today science has replaced God as a source of truth for many people. It is going to take effort to provide a reason for the hope that is in us. The hope that this world so desperately needs. Every Christian parent needs to take the time, and make the effort, to become educated in science.

This does not mean that every parent is expected to get a PhD in science. I know from experience that science can be confusing and scary for some. And I know that many parents lead very busy lives. But I also know that, with a little effort, anyone can learn the basics of science. The child needs only enough science to provide a foundation. With that foundation, and some encouragement, they can take it from there. And help should always be available from the local church. But unfortunately, this is often not the case.

When I was growing up I had questions about evolution. I was raised in a Christian home by Christian parents. They taught me that the Bible was true. While at school I was learning something else entirely. I was learning that life had originated on its own. I was learning that humans had evolved rather than having been created. One day I asked my dad about this. He had no idea of what to say but he did see my concern.

My father took me to our local church to meet with the pastor. I can still recall being in the basement of the church just before an afternoon potluck. The three of us were standing next to a table decorated with plates and silverware. Concerning evolution the pastor told me: “Just don’t believe it. It is from the devil”. I have to admit that I went back to school very confused. Here was my teacher presenting all of this “evidence” supporting evolution and all my pastor could say was “Just don’t believe it”. I do not blame my father and I do not blame the pastor. They did not know any better. But they should have.

Budgets can be tight and bills have to be paid. This can be true for both parents and churches alike. I believe however that the leaders of the church need to make certain that their members are scientifically literate. Local churches very often have youth leaders, choir directors and the like. I think that every local church should also have someone who is trained in the sciences. This may be a volunteer or they may need to be paid. In any event every local church should have someone who can train the parents who can then train their children.

Christians need to be able to defend their faith. And every Christian parent needs to be able to adequately train up their children. That training includes the sciences. In my opinion the teaching of evolution has led countless people over the years to deny Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. We send missionaries to the four corners of the Earth to proclaim the Gospel – and rightly so. And yet we ignore one of the largest mission fields on earth – our public schools.


Source by Jeff Van Fleet

The Educational Value of Playing With Legos

All kids at one time or another, if given the opportunity to do so, will find themselves lost to Legos. By that I mean, the joy of building and creating something from these simple, but unique toys, is something that all kids can understand and get wrapped up in. Entire cities can be created with enough time and Lego blocks. Play rooms can be transformed into monuments, dolls can have new furniture and cars can drive from home to the garage to any number of public buildings, all in a world of Legos. But beyond the obvious creative implications of Legos, there are other educational benefits as well, not the least of which are in the skills and concepts that they teach experientially.

The easiest benefits to point out are the educational tools of space, relationship and proportions, all of which will help to improve math awareness skills. Fun time playing with Legos teaches halves and wholes, depending on the blocks being used. Quarter blocks are also available, and while kids don’t refer to them by that name, they are learning division theory quite nicely! Angles must be taken into account as well when building, which is also learned experientially through trial and error as kids play with Legos and have the opportunity to create.

But what about other educational benefits of Legos? Legos also teach patience and perseverance. That may not seem like an educational payoff, but it is. Kids must learn to take their time, build up from the foundations, and “snap” things together nicely and securely before moving on. The understanding of these concepts will help students to perform better in school because parents know all too well that school concepts work in order, they take time and repetition. There is an order to the learning process in the same way that there’s an order to the building process. All kids like to skip steps in math, fail to show their work, avoid homework, etc. These are important parts to gaining educational competence, however, and Legos help to prepare our kids for this lesson.

Sometimes Legos get stuck together. In the same way, sometimes things get “stuck” for our kids. Having a common experience in Legos, children can be taught to work at their problems. They can learn not to give up. They can benefit from understanding that if things get stuck, they need to keep working to break their problems down into parts. One part at a time, problems are not so difficult to overcome. Do you ever remember scraping your knuckles on a set of Legos as you tried to pry them apart? Sometimes separating Legos is hard work, just like school, but the joy of creating new things, or getting to just the right “piece” is worth the hard work! School, too, is not always fun for every child, and some subjects will be less entertaining than others. But when a child perseveres in their studies, there is nothing more exciting to see than the glow on their faces when a concept is mastered.

Like Legos, our worlds are made up of different colors and shapes, purposes and potentials, but from Legos, we have much to learn. The educational benefits are not as straightforward as they might seem, but nevertheless, our “teachers” they can become.


Source by Camille Rodriquez